Benjamin Martin

The Culture of International Society: How Europe's Cultural Treaties Forged a Global Concept of Culture, 1919-1968

This project will examine the historical emergence of a global concept of culture in the twentieth century by analyzing a rich and largely untapped source: cultural treaties between states. That culture can be used to legitimate power is well established. This is also the case in international relations, where contrasting ideas about "culture"--cosmopolitan versus nationalist visions, for example--have been used to justify systems of domination over states and peoples. An anti-racist consensus on the equal value of the world's cultures is a premise of today's post-colonial world order. But where did that concept of culture come from and how did it win out over rival visions, above all the notion of "Civilization" associated with European imperialism? How are such global concepts formed and disseminated? Cultural treaties--legally binding agreements on what forms of culture shall be exchanged between two or more nation-states--offer a good source for a historical investigation of these questions. They illustrate how states agree on what culture is, what culture can and should do, and to what degree states should promote or regulate it. Through a comparative, multi-method study of the cultural treaties of several Western European states from 1919 to 1968, my project explores the emergence of a global concept of culture, based on the hypothesis that this concept, in contrast to earlier ideas of civilization, played a key role in the consolidation of the modern international order.